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We delve into the urban threats to the Powerful Owl and how we can play an active role in their protection. We also recount how the AHO team was privileged to be involved in the excavation of Aboriginal ancestral remains at Little Manly Beach. It’s wildflower season , so this issue is full of pretty pictures from around the Partner Council LGAs and our very own Bush Tucker Garden. We even created our own delicious recipe from our garden for you to try. 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See page 4 for details…) Please enjoy the second issue of Yarnupings for 2022   Yarnupings_Issue2_June-2022   [post_title] => Yarnupings Newsletter June 2022 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => yarnupings-newsletter-june-2022 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-07-01 17:11:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-07-01 07:11:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.aboriginalheritage.org/?p=3038 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 2 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3098 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2022-09-23 12:09:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-09-23 02:09:54 [post_content] =>   Image of newsletter September 2022This issue we look at the career of Aboriginal Heritage Office founder, David Watts. ‘How do you measure a ripple?’ looks at the positive flow on effects of the work of the AHO throughout the years. We delve into the urban threats to the Powerful Owl and how we can play an active role in their protection. We also recount how the AHO team was privileged to be involved in the excavation of Aboriginal ancestral remains at Little Manly Beach. It’s wildflower season , so this issue is full of pretty pictures from around the Partner Council LGAs and our very own Bush Tucker Garden. We even created our own delicious recipe from our garden for you to try. 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Yarnupings Newsletter September 2022   This issue we look at ...
Yarnupings Newsletter June 2022   This issue highlights and celebrates Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC ...

Welcome to the Aboriginal Heritage Office

AHO Museum reopens for the public
Wednesdays from the 13th July

Bookings can be made to view museum dependent
on staff availability

 

For help with Acknowledgements of Country, please go to our FAQ page.

 

Did you know there are over 1000 sites of Aboriginal culture and heritage in the areas of Sydney known as North Sydney, Ku-ring-gai, Lane Cove, Willoughby, Northern Beaches and Strathfield Councils?

The Aboriginal clans who once occupied this area left important evidence of  their past and way of life before colonisation.

The sites are of significance to the Aboriginal people because they are evidence of the past Aboriginal occupation of Australia and are valued as a link with their traditional culture.

There is also great scientific value in these sites. By studying the shells, stones and bones, we can learn a great deal about past environments, what plants and animals were used by people, what tools they used and how they survived.

Sites are under threat every day from development, vandalism and natural erosion. The sites can not be replaced, and once they are destroyed, they are lost forever.

The Role of the Aboriginal Heritage Office

Aboriginal Heritage SiteThe Aboriginal Heritage Office is a joint initiative by  Lane Cove, North Sydney, Willoughby, Ku-ring-gai, Strathfield and The Northern Beaches Council in a progressive move to protect Aboriginal heritage in these areas.

Part of the work of the Aboriginal Heritage office is to monitor these Aboriginal sites on a day to day basis and long term management reports are developed to ensure their preservation and protection.

Another key role of the Aboriginal Heritage Office is to give Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people involved with these council areas an avenue of approach to discuss issues or concerns they may have.

An important part of the role is to communicate with schools and other groups and help children develop a deeper understanding of the unique culture of Aboriginal people.

In association with the local councils, talks, walks and activities are conducted to enhance appreciation of Aboriginal culture in the wider community. A selection of information leaflets  on various Aboriginal heritage topics are available to download.  Find out more about what the AHO offers Councils and the community.  Or see our videos. There’s plenty more in our Resources section.

Have questions? Have a look at our Frequently Asked Questions page. For further information on these or any related matters, please contact us.